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Wild arrach (Chenopodium vulvaria)

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Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Chenopodiaceae (family), Chenopodium olidum, Chenopodium vulvaria, phytoncides, stinking goosefoot.

Background
  • Wild arrach (Chenopodium vulvaria), or stinking goosefoot, can be easily identified by its rotten-fish smell that is due to its trimethylamine content. The plant is native to Europe and is found in areas of North America as well. There is insufficient evidence currently available in humans to support the use of wild arrach for any indication.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Antimicrobial.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for wild arrach in adults.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for wild arrach in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to wild arrach (Chenopodium vulvaria), its constituents, or members of the Chenopodiaceae family.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Safety information on wild arrach is currently lacking.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

  • Wild arrach is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Interactions with Herbs & Dietary Supplements

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Cromwell BT. The micro-estimation and origin of trimethylamine in Chenopodium vulvaria L. Biochem J 1950;46(5):578-582.
  2. Stanchev BD, Takeva T. [On protistocide propertie of phytoncides of stinking goosefoot (Chenopodium botrys L.)]. Antibiotiki 1960;5:96.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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