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Castor bean (Ricinus communis)

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Also listed as: Ricinus communis, Castor oil
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Aceite de ricino (Spanish), AllanDerm-TT, asiixa'a (Nahuatl), castor oil, castor seed, Cremophor ELT (CrELT), Cremophor RH40 (AquaLubT), Emulsoil®, Euphorbiaceae (family), Fleet Castor Oil®, Granul-dermT, Granulex®, hydrogenated castor oil (Cutina® HR), kiki, lemon-flavored castor oil (Purge®), linoleic acid, Mexico seed, mole bean, oleic acid, OptaseT, Palma Christi (Spanish), polyoxyl 35 castor oil, polyoxyl 40 hydrogenated, RevinaT, ricin, ricino (Spanish), ricinoleic acid, Ricinus communis, RICOM-1013-J, undecylenic acid, xcoch (Mayan), XenadermT.
  • Select combination products: AllanDerm-TT, Granul-dermT, OptaseT, RevinaT, Trypsin Complex, XenadermT, Balsa-Derm®, Granul®, and Granulex® are brand names for a topical spray composed of trypsin, balsam of Peru, and castor oil.

Background
  • Castor oil, referred to as "kiki" and used by the ancient Egyptians and Greeks to treat many conditions, is a vegetable oil obtained from the castor seed (Ricinus communis). The name "castor" was given to the plant by English traders who confused its oil with the oil of another shrub called "agno-casto" in Jamaica.
  • Castor oil may be taken by mouth or applied to the skin or eyes. Castor oil packs, which are applied to the skin, are traditional holistic treatments for many conditions.
  • Castor oil is used as a folk remedy around the world. In India, it is massaged into the breasts after childbirth to encourage milk flow. In Ayurvedic medicine, a plaster-like mixture of castor oil seeds is applied to swollen and tender joints. In China, the crushed seeds are used to treat weaken or paralyzed muscles in the face. Castor seeds have been used in traditional medicine as an oral birth control agent among tribes from Nigeria.
  • When taken by mouth, clinical trials have shown that castor oil may act as a laxative or promote bowel movements before a colonoscopy or related procedures. Castor oil typically promotes bowel movement activity within 3-5 hours after ingestion. Castor oil may also induce labor in late pregnancies.
  • Castor oil is thought to potentially relieve aches and strains by drawing lactic acid out of the muscles. A rub composed of hot castor oil massaged into an infant's belly has been used to relieve colic and expel intestinal gas.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *


Early evidence has shown that a single dose of castor oil given by mouth may help cleanse the bowels. Some research suggests that castor oil is more effective at causing bowel movements than a high-fiber diet or milk of magnesia and cascara. There is disagreement about whether castor oil is better than a commercial kit composed of magnesium citrate oral solution, phenolphthalein, and bisacodyl.

A


Early evidence suggests that castor oil may promote cramping of the intestines and uterus, causing labor in late pregnancies when taken by mouth. Its activity may be as effective as oxytocin but with fewer associated risks. Limited research suggests that leakage of amniotic fluid into the mother's bloodstream and signs that the baby has had a bowel movement while still inside the womb may occur after taking castor oil by mouth. Further studies are needed before conclusions are made.

B


Early evidence suggests that castor oil may help prepare the digestive systems for a radiological exam, endoscopy, or colonoscopy. Some research suggests that although a single dose of castor oil given by mouth may be effective, its oily texture, unpleasant taste, and adverse effects limit its appeal. Additional research is needed in this area before a strong conclusion can be made.

B


Limited research suggests that applying eyedrops made from castor oil and water may promote tear formation and reduce tear evaporation for individuals with dry eye. Additional research is needed in this area before a strong conclusion can be made.

B


Castor seeds have been used in traditional medicine as an oral form of birth control among tribes in Nigeria. Further research is needed before a firm conclusion can be made.

C
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Abscess (pus collection), arthritis (joint swelling), breast cancer, bruises, cancer, cathartic (promotes bowel movements), cervical cancer, cholecystitis (swelling of the gallbladder), colds, colic, colitis (swelling of the large intestine), congestion, constipation, corns, cosmetic, cough, cystitis (swelling of the bladder), dermatitis (skin inflammation), dry skin, enema, epilepsy (seizures), facial palsy (weakness of facial muscles), fever, gastrointestinal disorders (appendicitis), headache, hypogonadism (reduced hormones production), inflammation, lactation (breastfeeding), liver conditions, lymph flow enhancement, muscle ache, neuritis (nerve inflammation), pain, painful joints, poisoning, promotion of digestion, ringworm, scleroderma (immune disorder that affects connective tissue), skin conditions (general), sprains and strains, sunburn, ulcer, uterine cancer, warts, wounds.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • For most conditions, 15-60 milliliters of castor oil has been given by mouth.
  • For bowel cleansing, a single dose of 30-80 milliliters of castor oil with water has been used.
  • To prepare for a colonoscopy, 60 milliliters of castor oil has been taken by mouth the night before the examination, with only water to be consumed afterwards.
  • For birth control, castor seeds, weighing 2.3-2.5 grams, have been given as a single oral dose with water after 4-5 days of menstruation.
  • To cause childbirth, a single 60-milliliter dose of castor oil has been taken by mouth.
  • To reduce inflammation of the eyelash follicles, castor oil has been applied over the eyelashes and eyelids at least 3-4 times daily for one week.
  • For conjunctivitis, 1-2 drops of castor oil have been applied to the eyes twice daily for three days.
  • For dry eyes, eyedrops containing a castor oil and water mixture have been used three times daily for 30 days.
  • For eye styes, two drops of castor oil in the affected eye 3-4 times daily for two days have been used.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • Consult a physician before giving castor oil to children. Use in children for occasional constipation is generally avoided.
  • For children under two years old,1.25-7.5 milliliters of castor oil by mouth has been used.
  • For children 2-11 years old, 5-15 milliliters of castor oil by mouth has been used.
  • For children over 11 years old, 15-60 milliliters of castor oil by mouth has been used.
  • For colic in infants, a hot castor oil rub massaged into an infant's belly has been used.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or sensitivity to the castor bean, castor oil, or other members of the family Euphorbiaceae.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • When taken by mouth, castor oil may cause abdominal cramps, abnormal heartbeat, alkalosis (pH imbalance), drowsiness, anorexia, burping, colon irritation, constipation, diarrhea, dizziness, fainting, fluid or electrolyte imbalance, gas, headaches, increased pain from menstrual cramps, insomnia, lack of coordination, leakage of amniotic fluid into a pregnant woman's bloodstream, low potassium levels, muscle cramps, nausea, permanent nerve damage, vomiting, and weakness.
  • When applied to the skin, castor oil may cause skin irritation; stinging; rash; itching; hives; swelling of the face, lips, or tongue; and bleeding or redness. Castor oil may also interact with other skin products.
  • When used as an eyedrop, castor oil may cause blurred vision.
  • Use cautiously in individuals who drive or operate heavy machinery, individuals wearing contact lenses, individuals taking agents that affect electrolytes, individuals taking fat-soluble vitamins, individuals taking agents that affect the immune system, individuals taking agents that affect p-glycoprotein modulators, and individuals taking digoxin.
  • Use cautiously in individuals taking agents that affect blood pressure, as castor oil may increase blood pressure when taken by mouth.
  • Use cautiously in breastfeeding women, as castor oil may leak into breast milk when taken by mouth.
  • Avoid use of unprocessed castor seeds or beans, as they may be toxic when touched or taken by mouth.
  • Avoid repeated castor oil use, due to the risk of dehydration and laxative dependence when taken by mouth.
  • Avoid use in pregnant women, due to the risk of causing labor when taken by mouth.
  • Avoid using by mouth in patients with signs of appendicitis or any gastrointestinal disorders.
  • Avoid taking other medications or herbs and supplements within two hours of taking castor oil by mouth.
  • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or sensitivity to the castor bean, castor oil, or other members of the family Euphorbiaceae.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Avoid in pregnant women, due to the risk of causing labor.
  • Use cautiously in breastfeeding women, as castor oil may be leaked into breast milk when taken by mouth.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Castor oil may increase blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking agents that affect blood pressure.
  • Castor oil may also interact with agents that affect the immune system, agents that regulate p-glycoprotein activity, anti-inflammatory agents, birth control agents, digoxin, diuretics (agents that control electrolyte levels), droperidol, laxatives, levomethadyl, painkillers, and silver sulfadiazine.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Castor oil may increase blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking herbs and supplements that affect blood pressure.
  • Castor oil may also interact with anti-inflammatory herbs and supplements, birth control herbs and supplements, cardiovascular herbs and supplements, diuretics (herbs and supplements that control electrolyte levels), fat-soluble vitamins, herbs and supplements that affect the immune system, herbs and supplements that regulate p-glycoprotein activity, laxatives, and painkillers.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Allaire, A. D., Moos, M. K., and Wells, S. R. Complementary and alternative medicine in pregnancy: a survey of North Carolina certified nurse-midwives. Obstet.Gynecol. 2000;95(1):19-23.
  2. Azhari, S., Pirdadeh, S., Lotfalizadeh, M., and Shakeri, M. T. Evaluation of the effect of castor oil on initiating labor in term pregnancy. Saudi.Med J 2006;27(7):1011-1014.
  3. Chen, C. C., Ng, W. W., Chang, F. Y., and Lee, S. D. Magnesium citrate-bisacodyl regimen proves better than castor oil for colonoscopic preparation. J.Gastroenterol.Hepatol. 1999;14(12):1219-1222.
  4. Di Pascuale, M. A., Goto, E., and Tseng, S. C. Sequential changes of lipid tear film after the instillation of a single drop of a new emulsion eye drop in dry eye patients. Ophthalmology 2004;111(4):783-791.
  5. Final report on the safety assessment of Ricinus Communis (Castor) Seed Oil, Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Glyceryl Ricinoleate, Glyceryl Ricinoleate SE, Ricinoleic Acid, Potassium Ricinoleate, Sodium Ricinoleate, Zinc Ricinoleate, Cetyl Ricinoleate, Ethyl Ricinoleate, Glycol Ricinoleate, Isopropyl Ricinoleate, Methyl Ricinoleate, and Octyldodecyl Ricinoleate. Int J Toxicol. 2007;26 Suppl 3:31-77.
  6. Garry, D., Figueroa, R., Guillaume, J., and Cucco, V. Use of castor oil in pregnancies at term. Altern.Ther.Health Med. 2000;6(1):77-79.
  7. Gray, M. and Jones, D. P. The effect of different formulations of equivalent active ingredients on the performance of two topical wound treatment products. Ostomy.Wound.Manage. 2004;50(3):34.
  8. Goto, E., Shimazaki, J., Monden, Y., Takano, Y., Yagi, Y., Shimmura, S., and Tsubota, K. Low-concentration homogenized castor oil eye drops for noninflamed obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction. Ophthalmology 2002;109(11):2030-2035.
  9. Khanal, S., Tomlinson, A., Pearce, E. I., and Simmons, P. A. Effect of an oil-in-water emulsion on the tear physiology of patients with mild to moderate dry eye. Cornea 2007;26(2):175-181.
  10. Kolts, B. E., Lyles, W. E., Achem, S. R., Burton, L., Geller, A. J., and MacMath, T. A comparison of the effectiveness and patient tolerance of oral sodium phosphate, castor oil, and standard electrolyte lavage for colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy preparation. Am.J.Gastroenterol. 1993;88(8):1218-1223.
  11. Mitri, F., Hofmeyr, G. J., and van Gelderen, C. J. Meconium during labour--self-medication and other associations. S.Afr.Med J 4-4-1987;71(7):431-433.
  12. Palese, A., Clementi, R., and Busetti, R. [Variability of intestinal preparation in patients undergoing stomach, intestine, uterus surgery at 4 hospitals]. Assist.Inferm.Ric. 2003;22(1):13-18.
  13. Pearce, E. I., Tomlinson, A., Blades, K. J., Falkenberg, H. K., Lindsay, B., and Wilson, C. G. Effect of an oil and water emulsion on tear evaporation rate. Adv.Exp.Med Biol. 2002;506(Pt A):419-423.
  14. Scarpa, A. and Guerci, A. Various uses of the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis L.). A review. J.Ethnopharmacol. 1982;5(2):117-137.
  15. Steingrub, J. S., Lopez, T., Teres, D., and Steingart, R. Amniotic fluid embolism associated with castor oil ingestion. Crit Care Med. 1988;16(6):642-643.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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