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Bean pod (Phaseolus vulgaris)

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Also listed as: French bean, Phaseolus vulgaris
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Alpha-AI, alpha-amylase inhibitor, anasazi bean, azufrado, baked bean, bayo bean, bean, black bean, black Jamapa bean, borlotto bean, bush bean, butter bean, cannellino bean, catalase, chymotrypsin inhibitor, common bean, coumestrol, cranberry bean, cyanidin, daidzein, delphinidin, Fabaceae (family), ferulic, field bean, flageolet bean, Flor de Mayo, French bean, French string bean, frijole bean, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, Great Northern bean, green bean, haricot bean (Aztec), haricot vert, haricots verts, hydroperoxides, kaempferol, kidney bean, kidney bean pods, kintoki bean, lablab bean, large white bean, legume, Leguminosae (family), lima beans, malvidin, marrow beans, Mexican beans, Mexican common beans, navy bean, pea bean, pectic acid, pelargonidin, peonidin, Perla black bean, petunidin, Phase 2 Starch Neutralizer®, Phase2®, Phaseolamin 2250®, Phaseoli fructus sine semine, phaseolin, Phaseolus vulgaris spp., phytoalexins, phytoestrogens, phytohemagglutinin, pinto bean, quercetin, red bean, red kidney bean, red speckled bean, scarlet runner, seed-free bean pods, snap bean, string bean, stringless bean, sugar bean, superoxide dismutase, Tora-mame, turtle bean, trypsin inhibitor, wax bean, white bean, white cloud bean, white kidney bean.

Background
  • The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is one of the most important members of the Fabaceae family of plants found worldwide. The green bean pods are cooked as a vegetable, and some varieties are stored dry, then rehydrated before cooking. Leaves are occasionally used as a salad.
  • Bean pods are believed to be helpful in obesity and weight loss programs, as well as obesity-related diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 2 and heart disease.
  • Bean pods are also commonly believed to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiviral, cleansing and detoxifying, diuretic (increases urination), emollient (moisturizing), and gas-relieving properties.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *


Currently, data on the therapeutic effect of bean pod in diabetes mellitus type 2 are lacking. Limited evidence has shown that a plant mixture containing bean pod may reduce blood sugar. More research is needed before a conclusion can be made.

C


There is conflicting evidence regarding the effects of bean pods on obesity or weight loss. Further well-designed studies are needed.

C
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Acne, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiviral, burns, carminative, cleansing impurities from the body, constipation, diarrhea, diuretic (increase urine flow), diverticulitis (inflamed and infected pouches in the large intestine), dropsy (swelling), dysentery (severe diarrhea), eczema (skin inflammation), heart diseases, hiccups (hiccoughs), irritable bowel syndrome, itch, kidney or bladder stones, postmenopausal osteoporosis, rheumatism, sciatica (sciatic nerve pain), skin care.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • In general, the typical dose of bean pod is one cup of tea taken by mouth several times daily, prepared by simmering 2.5 grams of bean pods in 150 milliliters of boiling water for 10-15 minutes and then straining the liquid, not to exceed 5-15 grams of bean pod daily.
  • For weight loss, 3,000 alpha-amylase inhibitor units (AAIU) daily, from Phase 2®, have been taken by mouth for 30 days. Phase 2® (1,500 milligrams) has been taken by mouth twice daily for eight weeks, and 1,000 milligrams of fractionated white bean extract has been taken by mouth twice daily for four weeks.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for bean pod in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid with known allergy or sensitivity to bean pod (Phaseolus vulgaris), its constituents, or members of the Fabaceae family.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Consumption of bean pod in typical dietary amounts is likely to be safe.
  • Bean pods may cause stomach upset, reduced nutrient absorption, and diarrhea.
  • Bean pods may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
  • Use cautiously in patients using diuretics (drugs that increase urination), due to a risk of electrolyte imbalance.
  • Use cautiously in patients using laxatives.
  • Avoid ingesting large amounts of fresh bean husks.
  • Avoid in children or in pregnant or breastfeeding women, due to a lack of safety evidence.
  • Avoid in individuals with known allergy to bean pod (Phaseolus vulgaris), its constituents, or members of the Fabaceae family.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Avoid in children or in pregnant or breastfeeding women, due to a lack of safety evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Bean pods may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking insulin or drugs for diabetes by mouth should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
  • Because bean pod contains estrogen-like chemicals, the effects of other agents believed to have estrogen-like properties may be altered.
  • Bean pods may interact with antibiotics, antiobesity agents, antiprotozoals, antiviral agents, diuretics (drugs that increase urination), drugs used for osteoporosis, estrogens, and laxatives.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Bean pods may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.
  • Because bean pods contain estrogen-like chemicals, the effects of other agents believed to have estrogen-like properties may be altered.
  • Bean pods may interact with antibacterials, antiobesity agents, antioxidants, antiparasitics, antiviral agents, diuretics (agents that increase urination), laxatives, osteoporosis agents, and phytoestrogens (plants with estrogen-like properties).

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Blair MW, Diaz JM, Hidalgo R, et al. Microsatellite characterization of Andean races of common bean (P L.). Theor Appl Genet 2007;116(1):29-43.
  2. Blair MW, Giraldo MC, Buendia HF, et al. Microsatellite marker diversity in common bean ( L.). Theor Appl Genet 2006;113(1):100-109.
  3. Blair MW, Pedraza F, Buendia HF, et al. Development of a genome-wide anchored microsatellite map for common bean ( L.). Theor Appl Genet 2003;107(8):1362-1374.
  4. Celleno L, Tolaini MV, D'Amore A, et al. A Dietary supplement containing standardized extract influences body composition of overweight men and women. Int J Med Sci 2007;4(1):45-52.
  5. Diaz LM, Blair MW. Race structure within the Mesoamerican gene pool of common bean ( L.) as determined by microsatellite markers. Theor Appl Genet 2006;114(1):143-154.
  6. Espinosa-Alonso LG, Lygin A, Widholm JM, et al. Polyphenols in wild and weedy Mexican common beans ( L.). J Agric Food Chem 2006;54(12):4436-4444.
  7. Grisi MC, Blair MW, Gepts P, et al. Genetic mapping of a new set of microsatellite markers in a reference common bean () population BAT93 x Jalo EEP558. Genet Mol Res 2007;6(3):691-706.
  8. Ionescu-Tirgoviste C, Popa E, Mirodon Z,. [The effect of a plant mixture on the metabolic equilibrium in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus]. Rev Med Interna Neurol Psihiatr Neurochir Dermatovenerol Med Interna 1989;41(2):185-192.
  9. Lara-Diaz VJ, Gaytan-Ramos AA, Davalos-Balderas AJ, et al. Microbiological and toxicological effects of Perla black bean ( L.) extracts: in vitro and in vivo studies. Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol 2009;104(2):81-86.
  10. Maras M, Susnik S, Sustar-Vozlic J, et al. Temporal changes in genetic diversity of common bean ( L.) accessions cultivated between 1800 and 2000. Genetika 2006;42(7):947-954.
  11. Morales-de Leon JC, Vazquez-Mata N, Torres N, et al. Preparation and characterization of protein isolate from fresh and hardened beans ( L.). J Food Sci 2007;72(2):C96-102.
  12. Shirke SS, Jadhav SR, Jagtap AG. Osteoprotective effect of L in ovariectomy-induced osteopenia in rats. Menopause 2009;16(3):589-596.
  13. Udani J, Singh BB. Blocking carbohydrate absorption and weight loss: a clinical trial using a proprietary fractionated white bean extract. Altern Ther Health Med 2007;13(4):32-37.
  14. Udani J, Hardy H, Madsen DC. Blocking carbohydrate absorption and weight loss: a clinical trial using Phase 2 brand proprietary fractionated white bean extract. Altern Med Rev 2004;9(1):63-69.
  15. Venkateswaran S, Pari L, Saravanan G. Effect of on circulatory antioxidants and lipids in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. J Med Food 2002;5(2):97-103.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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